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Guides

Guide: The city’s best ethnic bakeries

Columbus’ ethnic diversity is mirrored in its bakeries with immigrants kneading and rolling out the flavors of home.

Breakfast: Great coffee and pastry pairings

It’s mid-morning. Breakfast is a distant memory, and lunch is still hours away. It’s time to hit the nearby coffee shop for caffeine and a snack. Here’s where to find a little local nourishment around town.

Charcuterie: Chefs share their craft

In the belly of The Table, Donte Allen is in his zone. His eyes and shoulders are relaxed, and his knife hand dips in and out of a slab of chicken sausage with gentle, rhythmic fluidity.

Fried chicken: Pick your style

Used to be only a few games in town offered authentic, flavor-packed bites of crispy fried chicken. Now, you don’t have to travel to the other side of the Mason-Dixon Line for a fix. Here’s where to satisfy whatever style you’re craving.

Behind the bar: shrubs

Cocktail shrubs have been around for more than 400 years, so it’s no surprise there’s no single method for prepping these piquant infusions of produce, sugar and vinegar. Three area bartenders share their preferred methods for achieving the best result.

Guide: The best ramen in town

Ramen—it’s a confusing subject. And it’s all the more confusing because it’s hard to understand why it is confusing in the first place. It’s just noodles, broth and toppings, isn’t it? How hard could it be? But Japanese chefs spent decades learning to perfect it. It’s also something packaged in freeze-dried bricks and sold for three for 99 cents. As I said, confusing. Clearly the current American ramen craze aspires to reach the Japanese chef-crafted approach. I’ve sampled top-notch ramen in Japan; local contenders aren’t quite a match for the real thing, falling slightly short on technique and proper ingredients. Nonetheless, there are good bowls of ramen to be found in Columbus, sometimes in unexpected places.
Guide Archive